Becoming one

by Vivienne Baillie Gerritsen

There are different ways of producing progeny. In eukaryotes, the most widespread method is for two reproductive cells of the opposite sex to meet and fuse. This may sound straightforward but mating is never an easy affair. Not only must the two cells belong to the same species but they must also make sure that they belong to different mating-types. They then have to know how to recognise each other, adhere to one another, fuse and create a space in which their nuclei will meet, mingle and ultimately give birth to a new individual - a series of events that demonstrates how accidental any form of life is in the first place. Though to date very little is known about reproductive cell fusion on the molecular level, each of these steps probably involves a complex interplay of many different proteins. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii scientists have unveiled part of the molecular mechanics of a protein that has a direct role in fusing such cells. It has been called Hapless 2.

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Protein Spotlight (ISSN 1424-4721) is a monthly review written by the Swiss-Prot team of the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics. Spotlight articles describe a specific protein or family of proteins on an informal tone. Follow us: Subscribe · Twitter · Facebook

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